Work Zone Mobility and Safety Program
Photo collage: temporary lane closure, road marking installation, cone with mounted warning light, and drum separated work zones.
Office of Operations 21st Century Operations Using 21st Century Technologies

Best Practice

BEST PRACTICE:

A6−7: Commuter Incentives to Minimize Congestion in Work Zones

DESCRIPTION:

Techniques such as incident management and aggressive lane rental specification are used to preserve existing freeway capacity on Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) construction projects. To minimize congestion in areas where existing capacity cannot be maintained, ODOT implements one or more strategies in coordination with local partners to reduce the number trips made in a corridor during peak commute periods. Commuter incentives and other demand reduction measures may include:
Providing transit incentives such as free Amtrak commuter rail service;
Providing carpool incentives such as free carpool parking;
Implementing guaranteed ride home program;
Temporarily converting general purpose travel lanes to HOV lanes;
Increasing transit service coverage and frequency;
Constructing additional or expanding existing park and ride lots so transit connections are more convenient; and
Marketing and promoting telecommuting, job−sharing, and employee flextime programs with employers in the affected area.

REASON(S) FOR ADOPTING:

In anticipation of traffic congestion resulting from construction−related reduced freeway capacity commuter incentive programs can help maintain acceptable levels of service through a work zone.

PRIMARY BENEFIT(S):

Benefits include reducing traffic congestion in the work zone; decreasing traffic diversion onto neighborhood streets; attracting drivers away from single−occupant vehicles to other modes during construction (with the additional benefit of retaining some ridership and use of carpools beyond project completion); and improving air quality due to fewer vehicles in the traffic stream.

MOST APPLICABLE LOCATION(S)/PROJECT(S):

Projects in urban areas with established transit systems or carpooling programs, and projects on facilities with HOV lanes or general−purpose lanes that could be converted to HOV.

STATE(S) WHERE USED:

Oregon

SOURCE/CONTACT(S):

Jeff Graham, FHWA Oregon Division Office
Phone: (503) 587−4727
E−mail: jeffrey.graham@dot.gov

Office of Operations